Category Archives: neuroscience general

Neuroscience SciComm Exchange

I am happy to announce that I have opened an exclusive Facebook group specifically for neuroscientists who engage in science communication and science communicators/journalists who specialize in neuroscience.

The purpose of the group is to network by sharing your work and experience, as well as interesting topics you come across.

If you are interested in joining the group, please apply!

I will alter your brain!!

In July I participated in the German science web video contest “Fast Forward Science”. In this video I explain the concept of the “brain changes” that people keep talking about in the headlines: brain states, and neuroplasticity.

The video is in German, but you can switch on English subtitles.

P.S. Unfortunately the video did not make it into the second round 🙁

Getting Real with my Video Series

Well, it’s out and announced in both my YouTube Channel welcome message and this other preview video that I posted on Facebook and LinkedIn.

I am planning to do two series, and I hope to publish them alternately and I also hope to get the first one out by Thursday, February 7th. Crossing fingers that this will work out!

Continue reading Getting Real with my Video Series

Why I think neurons are computers and why it matters.

The question about whether neurons perform computations came around several times on twitter, lately and there were at least two spin-off blog posts that came from these discussions:
Is the idea that neurons perform ‘computations’ in any way meaningful? from Adam Calhoun (@neuroecology) and then
The Diversity of Computation
by @mnxmnkmnd

So far so good. It appears that basically there is little discussion about whether neurons compute things. However, a new conversation between me and @mnxmnkmnd came up as I realized that for him it appears to be close to irrelevant whether you call a neuron a computer or not and you don’t learn more from emulating the computational function of a neuron than from simulating the thing the same way you would from simulating fluid dynamics or a pendulum.

So, here is my new attempt to explain, why I think it is important and meaningful to think of neurons as computing agents rather than simply physical phenomena.

Continue reading Why I think neurons are computers and why it matters.

Depth perception in small, flying animals – Introduction

Just recently the last article from my PhD thesis was published by Frontiers in Integrative Neurophysiology! I want to explain to you over the next few posts what my thesis was all about – several posts because I don’t like long posts :P. So, today I start with this brief introduction:

My collaborators and I want to know how small animals can see things during fast flight. Well, it is actually not only about just seeing things. Small animals, especially fast moving ones must be able to quickly realize where all the things around them are and which of those they might collide with if they don’t maneuver around them in time. Imagine you are a little zebra finch, just 12 grams body weight, and you are sitting at the water pond home in Australia minding your own business, taking a sip, washing the dust off your feathers or hopping around looking for grains to eat. And then all of the sudden a warning call! One of your peers has seen a bird of prey approaching! What follows is total chaos – well at least from the perspective of an outsider – everybody, maybe hundreds of fellow zebra finches, rush from the water pond into the bushes and tree tops near by. Flying buddies everywhere, leafs, twigs, branches and you have to be quick! And this is not a made up story, just watch this video!

The question is

Why do zebra finches not crash into each other and into branches?

Continue reading Depth perception in small, flying animals – Introduction